News from Industry

Kranky Geek 2018. A post event post

bloggeek - Mon, 11/19/2018 - 12:00

For me, Kranky Geek 2018 was a tremendously fun experience.

We had our fourth Kranky Geek event in San Francisco last week. As usual, it is a nerve wrecking experience up until the point it ends. And it doesn’t start on the day of the event itself – we’ve been busy with content curation, handling presentation drafts and doing dry runs for a few weeks.

The result is quite satisfying. We’ve decided this time to dig even deeper into the domain of artificial intelligence and machine learning and its role in real time communications. As I’ve been saying, WebRTC is ready – so what would be the point of doing an event about WebRTC? We have a lot of WebRTC topics already covered from our past events – and they are all available in the Kranky Geek YouTube channel.

The way we see it, there are 4 domains we had to cover: speech analytics, voicebots, computer vision and RTC optimization.

So we went hunting for the event. In the end, we were able to cover all four domains and squeeze a few WebRTC specific topics as well.

The Sessions

This year, we had the biggest number of sessions. The event has become a full day event from a shorter one over the years. The people I talked to noted that the day was long and tiring, but somehow, almost everyone stayed to the end. Here’s what we had this year:

Our own welcome

Kranky Geek SF 2018: AI in RTC from Tsahi Levent-levi

One thing to note here – our AI in RTC report got a promotional discount of ~33%, which will be available until the end of the month. If this space interests you, then definitely check it out.

Discord

Discord operates a large chat operation for gamers. Part of that service includes voice and video calling. At peak, they handle 2.8 million concurrent voice connections to their service.

What they shared, was the changes they have done to the vinyl WebRTC code base in order to fit their needs.

Facebook

Facebook were kind enough to give a presentation around Facebook Portal – their new home device that is capable of handling video calls (using WebRTC of course). The device uses machine learning to track the people in the room during a call. They talked about the challenges that comes with automating the camera’s zoom and with connecting calls from Portal devices to mobile phones.

This was the first time they shared that information publicly at a conference.

Intel

Intel announced open sourcing their media server – the Intel Collaboration Suite for WebRTC – under the name of Open Media Streamer. They also shared information of svt-hevc, their open source HEVC encoder.

Voicebase

Voicebase talked about Paralinguistics – the way we speak as opposed to the words we are saying. They shared the path they took charting that space, and understanding what makes more sense or less sense in terms of value.

Voicera

Voicera discussed virtual assistants and how they need to understand transcriptions.

IBM

IBM explained the notion of voicebots and how it fits into contact centers. They explained the need to be able to handoff a voicebot to a human agent.

Nexmo

Nexmo showed a demo using Dialog Flow, connected to a voice service for ordering a pizza. It stressed the need to be able to connect communication services to various machine learning ones.

Dialpad

Dialpad explained how to take an open source speech to text engine and add some custom words into it in order to improve the accuracy of the transcription.

Callstats

Callstats clustered the sessions they are collecting, trying to figure out by that information the type of call and root cause of issues it may have.

RingCentral

RingCentral normalized MOS scores of audio calls across its network and devices, to be able to give a clear indication of call quality – it appears that while there’s a standard specification for MOS, asking device manufacturers to follow it to the letter is rather challenging, so using machine learning they are “fixing” that issue.

Google

Google talked about the current status and efforts in getting Chrome’s WebRTC implementation to 1.0 specification. It also shared the work being done to improve audio stability and performance in Chrome (lots of architecture changes in how devices get accessed in order to reduce the number of threads used and get a stable delay model for its acoustic echo canceller). There was also a look at what goes after 1.0 – WebRTC NV and what role may WebAssembly play there (I’ll write more about it in the future).

Agora

Agora showed how they use super resolution to improve video quality in calls, and what it means to run super resolution on a mobile device.

Houseparty

Houseparty used machine learning to improve video quality as well, taking a different approach. They shared the work they are doing and the effort it takes to bring it to production.

Microsoft

Microsoft shared the work done on WebRTC on UWP and explained how AR/VR fits into the story and the enterprise use cases they are seeing in the market.

Session Recordings

As always, all the sessions were recorded and are available online.

Kranky Geek in 2019

Every year we’ve done a Kranky Geek event, we came in with the notion that this is the last one. Not sure why, but that was always the case. Then about 9 months after the event, we started discussing with Google about the next event.

We’ve changed that this time. We are going to do an event in 2019, and we have a name for it:

Kranky Geek SF 2019

We have a tentative date for the event: November 15, 2019

Put it in your calendar.

We don’t yet know what the theme for next year will be, but I have a hunch that it will include WebRTC and machine learning

If you want to speak – contact me

If you want to sponsor – contact me

If you have feedback on what we should improve – you know – contact me

Oh – and if you are interested in AI in WebRTC, check out our report – there’s a discount available for it until the end of the month.

The post Kranky Geek 2018. A post event post appeared first on BlogGeek.me.

8×8 Acquires Jitsi From Atlassian. Winners and Losers

bloggeek - Thu, 11/08/2018 - 12:00

Jitsi was just acquired by 8×8, shifting hands from Atlassian. Here’s what to expect.

It seems that Jitsi has now switched hands, moving from Atlassian to 8×8.

Three months ago, Atlassian made a bold (desperate?) decision. It put up a white flag, decided to kill Stride, after investing in it huge amounts of money and resources, throw Hipchat along with it, and “sell” them to Slack, who “acquired” them.

The weird thing in this acquisition was that Jitsi was left behind.

Jitsi is an open source media framework. One of the most popular WebRTC frameworks out there. I wrote about that acquisition in 2015. The reason behind it was Atlassian’s need to own the video communications technically that powered Hipchat. And now that Hipchat is gone, what would Atlassian need Jitsi for?

The last 3 years

The last 3 years have been good for Jitsi in Atlassian.

The team of developers it had was big, considering its scope (and open-sourceness). Especially if you factor in the fact that everything that Hipchat (and Stride) needed from Jitsi was implemented directly inside Jitsi. Not on a private branch of the project available only to Atlassian.

Compare it to how Twilio treated Kurento after its acquisition… Atlassian did a great job at keeping Jitsi’s momentum and community. At the very least, it didn’t hurt the project, letting it grow and flourish, paying the salaries of its developers.

The interesting initiative that took place alongside the Jitsi open source project is Jitsi Meet – a free version of a group video calling service. One that wasn’t limited to a small number of participants or lower video resolutions.

Jitsi is in a better place than it were 3 years ago prior to its acquisition.

Leaving Atlassian

Leaving Atlassian was a matter of time.

There was no room in today’s Atlassian for an open source project like Jitsi that brings no added value to its commercial products.

Jitsi didn’t go to Slack as part of the Hipchat/Stride deal. Slack were already using Janus, and moving on to their own homegrown media server – something they shared with us at Kranky Geek 2017 (hint: come and join us this year at Kranky Geek 2018). There was no reason for them to further invest in yet another migration – or they might have wanted to migrate to Jitsi and acquihire the team but it didn’t pan out.

That left Atlassian with one of 3 alternatives:

  1. Kill the project and be done with it. Send the developers home or integrate them into some other parts of Atlassian. It would work nicely, but if the asset can be sold, then why not recoup some money?
  2. Spin out the project. Let the team go, giving them back ownership of the code, and have them go scrape for a livelihood around Jitsi. Probably by offering a commercial license, support and customization services, etc. – this isn’t that far out as an idea – it is how Janus (another open source media framework) operates today and how Jitsi operated prior to its acquisition by Atlassian
  3. Sell it to someone who’s interested in it. This is what it ended up doing. Given the other alternatives in front of them, I tend to agree with Andy’s statement that this is a mercy sale
Joining 8×8

8×8 acquiring Jitsi is an interesting choice.

Here’s where things get interesting:

8×8 already has a WebRTC based web conferencing solution called “8×8 Virtual Office Meetings Online”. Somewhere in 2016, this service got rewritten. At some point between then and now, guest access on Chrome was introduced. From the looks of it, based on WebRTC.

Why would 8×8 need/want Jitsi when it had a solution already?

I can think of three possible reasons for it:

  1. Their WebRTC solution isn’t that good, too expensive, and they were looking for a better alternative. Jitsi was a catch in such a case
  2. 8×8 is looking to own its video technology and not use third party software, commercial or open source
  3. They were using Jitsi for their 8×8 meetings thingy and Atlassian selling that assent was an opportunity for them to control the tech stack without relying on a third party – probably on the cheap

What would 8×8 do with Jitsi?

The obvious thing is to integrate the tech into its meetings service. If it is already there, then use the Jitsi team of developers to tweak and finetune the thing for the 8×8 use case.

If it isn’t there yet, then integrate it and replace its current WebRTC tech in the meetings app. This is a more challenging undertaking, as Jitsi will need to meet the current feature list of what 8×8 already has in that domain, along with integrating to an existing codebase of a service and an application.

Jitsi probably has most of the needed features to make this happen. It wouldn’t have been acquired otherwise.

On a different area, 8×8 has no real open source activity at the moment. Its github account is mostly forked repos. Searching for “8×8 open source” is dominated by the Jitsi acquisition news:

(the rest are comparisons to other vendors, who are leaning more heavily on open source)

If 8×8 is interested in embracing open source, then it just got an interesting opportunity to do just that. While brings me to the last topic –

The future of Jitsi

What will be of Jitsi?

Here we need to look at Jitsi and Jisti Meet separately.

Jitsi

The Jitsi Videobridge, along with its derivatives, add ons, plugins, extensions and client-side SDKs.

That’s the open source part of the project. At Atlassian, there was nothing kept for internal use of Hipchat/Stride. Everything found its way back to the open source project.

Will 8×8 continue in that path?

Their focus in the coming months is going to be the integration of Jitsi into their 8×8 meetings service. They are bound to use the resources of the Jitsi team to do that.

Managers may decide to implement some of the features in the 8×8 meetings service moving forward and not invest in adding it to the Jitsi open source project. Or they might decide to add everything via Jitsi.

8×8 might end up taking the extreme – ditching the Jitsi project as an open source one – embed it into their meetings app and from there on, invest in that privat branch only. I see that as a highly unlikely outcome in the next 2-3 years.

Time will tell which direction is taken.

Jitsi Meet

Jitsi Meet is a different story altogether.

It is a group video meeting service. One which doesn’t limit the users’ bitrate in sessions, doesn’t limit the number of users in a session, offers mobile apps, Slack and calendar integration and scales globally. All for free.

Would 8×8 see it as competition to their own 8×8 meetings app? If it grows in popularity and its maintenance costs increase, how happy would 8×8 be in paying the bills? Would it see Jitsi Meet as a sales tool for its other services? How would it measure the success of this service?

Whatsapp’s founders just left Facebook this year. It was over disputes about data, privacy and such. Most of all, it was probably a dispute around the future of Whatsapp and Facebook’s intent of monetizing the asset. The same (at a much smaller scale) can happen here at some point.

How would 8×8 monetize Jitsi Meet? Should it? If it doesn’t, should it kill it?

I don’t know the answers. I am sure 8×8 doesn’t either. It is just too early to tell.

Last Words

Jitsi is an open source success story in WebRTC. There’s no doubt about it.

It is now entering a new chapter in its life, under 8×8.

I wish the team the best of luck and us as an industry to have the option to use Jitsi for our future projects.

Media Frameworks are part of the picture of the backend story of WebRTC. Care to learn the rest? Try out my free mini-video series on WebRTC backedn servers:

Register to the video series

The post 8×8 Acquires Jitsi From Atlassian. Winners and Losers appeared first on BlogGeek.me.

Meet me @ Kranky Geek San Francisco 2018

bloggeek - Mon, 11/05/2018 - 12:00

Kranky Geek is happening this year again, the date is Nov 16, and we’ve got the best lineup of speakers for you.

Kranky Geek started almost by mistake. Like most good things that happened to me. It wasn’t planned. The result though is becoming a tradition by now, where I get to work with Chris Koehncke and Chad Hart for a period of time that can be considered quite intense (we’re all too opinionated).

Google, along with our other sponsors make this event happen. We only curate the content to make sure the end result is great.

In last year’s event, we started looking at the domain of AI. You can find the recordings of that event on YouTube. The feedback we got was positive, so this year we’re taking a step further here. Many of the sessions will focus on machine learning and AI and its impact on real time communications.

What’s on the Agenda?

AI in RTC.

As always, our intent here is to focus as much as possible on services and applications that are running in production already. It won’t be theories about what can be done but what are people doing. Today.

The updated agenda can be found online. It might change a bit in its ordering, but it is mostly ready.

This year, we have some brand new speakers for you:

  • Discord will be giving a session about their service and what they had to do with WebRTC to make it work for their use case. My suggestion? Read their post to get ready for this session – it will be really interesting
  • Houseparty are joining us for the first time as well. Tinkering with machine learning on device. One of the main challenges these days is deciding where to run inference with machine learning – on device or in the cloud. We will see both options throughout the day
  • Agora will explain what they are doing to improve video quality in real time on mobile devices by using machine learning
  • Voicera will be talking about the challenges in speech recognition when it comes to handling meetings
  • Dialpad are there to talk custom vocabularies. Every company has that. How do you transcribe Kranky Geek? That’s a question I’ll ask in the Q&A of this session…
  • Intel will discuss newly open sourced visual processing tools to help you build out your application
  • RingCentral is joining us late in the game. We’re figuring out with them a stellar topic for the event

We also have some “repeat” speakers:

  • Facebook this year will give us a sneak peek at the technology (and AI) behind their new Facebook Portal device. What I am really keen on hearing is what decisions they made to get their “follow you around” feature to work
  • Voicebase will focus on paralinguistics this time. The nuances of speech that aren’t text – and how to capture their meaning
  • Callstats will be discussing this time the use of looking at ongoing call data using… machine learning
  • IBM will be all over voicebots and their uses in contact centers. We will get to look under the hood on how these get implemented
  • Nexmo are going to show us the complexity of connecting real time voice streams to cloud based speech to text engines. (technically, there are a new speaker, but I figured that now that TokBox is part of Vonage which also owns Nexmo, they are repeat speakers)
  • Google will give an update on Chrome’s implementation of WebRTC, with a focus on 1.0. They will also give a deep-dive into the upcoming architectural changes in Chrome’s audio processing engine
  • Microsoft is going to give us a demo of WebRTC, Mixed/Augmented Reality and HoloLens. And we’re saving this for last so you’ll stick around

We are expanding our family of Kranky Geek speakers and Kranky Geek companies, which is a true joy. I can’t wait to hear your feedback once the day is over.

Our sponsors this year

As always, the event is practically free to attend (there’s a $10 admission fee that gets donated to Girl Develop It).

The companies that made this event happen this year are Google, Intel, Agora.io and Nexmo who are our premium partners for the event; Callstats.io ,Voicebase and RingCentral who are our silver partners for the event.

No fire drill

I am not sure if this is good or bad. We had a surprise fire drill last year. We knew about it about a week or two before the event. It cause so much headache for us. And a lot of worries.

It ended up pretty well, with our audience and speakers getting a one hour break outside on a beautiful sunny day. Almost all of them came back after the drill, which isn’t obvious or even expected.

Many were happy for the break – and the smalltalk that ensued during it.

Hopefully, there will only be pleasant surprises this year as well.

What are we looking for in Kranky Geek?

We had to turn down a few vendors who wanted to speak. This is a process that takes place every year.

There’s no specific set of rules of what we approve or don’t as a session in Kranky Geek, but for me it boils down to this:

  1. Something new that wasn’t discussed at Kranky Geek before
  2. Preference to something running in production at scale
  3. An interesting topic that would appeal developers
  4. Related to real time communications
  5. A speaker that can “hold a room”

While the lineup of speakers for this year is full, if you want to speak in future Kranky Geek events – be sure to catch me during the event for a chat.

Should you travel just for this single day?

I got this question a few times in the past few weeks.

My guess is that if this is the only thing you’re doing in San Francisco and coming for, then skip it. Especially if you are traveling from abroad.

That said, if you want to feel where WebRTC is headed, talk to many of the people who deal with it daily in the real world, then this is the place to be. So many discussions take place during the breaks that it might be worth coming only for the breaks… I know a person or two that are coming only for that.

We try to make Kranky Geek special and unique. We work hard to select the speakers and work with them on their presentations. All to make it worth your travel, wherever you come from.

Can non-developers attend?

We received this question recently.

There is no easy answer to this one. On one hand, the event and its session are technical in nature as our focus is developers. On the other hand, the sessions are short (20 minutes all-in-all), so our speakers tend to focus on the essence and not dive too deep into the nitty gritty details. So a tough call.

My suggestion? Check out some of the session recordings on YouTube from past events and make your decision based on that.

Register now

Yes. there’s this minor detail.

You need to register to attend. There’s limited room capacity, and at some point, we will need to close the registration.

We’re already half full in our registration list, so save your spot now and don’t wait.

Register NOW

 

 

 

Do you want to meet me prior to the event?

I’ll be in San Francisco Nov 12-17. Nov 15-16 are reserved for Kranky Geek. The rest for meetings with people – around WebRTC, CPaaS, testRTC, my WebRTC course, consulting and just catching up.

If you want to meet me during that week, leave me a note.

The post Meet me @ Kranky Geek San Francisco 2018 appeared first on BlogGeek.me.

FOSDEM 2019 – RTC DevRoom – CFP And Volunteers

miconda - Mon, 10/29/2018 - 20:30
FOSDEM 2019 (the free and open source software developers meeting) takes place during the 2nd and the 3rd of February 2019 in Brussels, Belgium:The application to host a Real Time Communication devroom has been accepted and the call for presentations and volunteers has been started. The announcement with all the relevant details has been sent to the mailing list:Consider to submit a proposal if you have worked on something FOSS and interesting to share that is related to real time communications.It is very likely that Kamailio project will participate once again at the event with a consistent group of developers and community members, continuing our more than 10 years long tradition to meet for a dinner and catch up on what new around RTC world!Thanks for flying Kamailio!

Are Embeddable Video Experiences Necessary?

bloggeek - Mon, 10/29/2018 - 12:00

There’s no one size fits all in communications. In video, that means that embeddable video experiences are necessary and they are here to stay – they aren’t a passing trend.

Source: Vidyo

Years ago, before WebRTC came into our lives, I worked at a video conferencing company. My role there at the time was CTO of the business unit dealing with licensing VoIP technology to others. The leading product at the time, was a video conferencing client that can fit into device and able to interoperate in SIP and H.323. As a CTO, I was given the initiative of getting us into the cloud, which ended up involving something that was meant to become a CPaaS (just not using that term as it didn’t exist). It never came to fruition since I left the company a bit after WebRTC was announced and I knew where the future is headed.

Anyway, one day I was asked to take a business trip to the US, to meet with customers and potential customers. One of these customers was a vendor involved in the prison industry (not sure what’s the whitewashed term for that is, so just using prison industry).

Video Conferencing in Prisons

To clarify: I am not taking a stand here around prisons, prisoners or video conferencing in prisons. Just sharing this as a requirement that I’ve seen in the past.

What they were doing was building “phone booths” for prisoners so they could call home and talk to friends and family. They were in the process of shifting towards video calling, and were using at the time one of the known brands – I don’t remember which. Think of Polycom or Cisco video conferencing systems for reference.

Source (somehow, the happy faces seem exaggerated for the use case)

The challenge was in the fact that these vendors and their solutions were geared towards video conferencing in the enterprise – what we now wrap under the term of unified communications. This meant that a lot of the features and requirements that a vendor developing a communications service for prisoners were hard or impossible to meet:

  • Full moderation of the call by a third party at all times
  • Ability to join the session as a silent or known participant (that’s the moderator)
  • Ability to manage and control session length
  • Knowing the identity of both people in the call, but having the system flexible enough to accomodate for new users and guests in the system
  • Wrap the whole experience with other features (browsing) that prisoners might want to use

They ended up licensing our technology to build it all, at prices that today would seem ridiculously high, though made sense at these days, when real time communications technology wasn’t a commodity and wasn’t open sourced.

If we’re at the domain of anecdotes, funnily enough, we’ve been using GIPS for the audio codecs at that time on PCs. The same company that Google acquired and built WebRTC out of.

Back to Embeddable Video Experiences

Prisons and prisoners aren’t the real story here.

Embeddable video is.

Communications between humans is something that can’t really be placed into a set of known rules.

Yes. We’ve had the telephone companies around for 120 years or so, explaining and educating us on how to communicate with each other remotely.

Unified communications has a gazillion of features dealing with telephony, trying to accommodate each and every eventuality that a customer may want and need. Which is nice, but from a certain point, it is really hard to scale across customers with different needs.

Video conferencing has been the hardest of all. Video is hard, so everything about it is hard as well.

This all meant that communications was always a service. Something you get “out of the box” as is. Or something you can customize if you are big enough, with enough money to pay.

WebRTC, cloud, virtualization, SaaS and a few other terms came into our lives. What they essentially did was reduce the barrier of entry for those who need video communications. This meant that scenarios that weren’t catered for with enterprise video conferencing were now possible to achieve at lower price points.

The end result?

We are now seeing video communications being embedded in places where it never really existed.

Are these new?

They are and they aren’t.

They aren’t because the need was always there.

They are because only now they can be satisfied commercially.

The only question that remains is where do you see embeddable video contributing to your business and how do you go about implementing it. In the last few months, I’ve been working with Vidyo on a research around this topic exactly.

Interested in the state of embedded video in 2018? Download the free report here.There’s also a joint webinar on the topic coming up – be sure to register to it:

Register to the free webinar

The post Are Embeddable Video Experiences Necessary? appeared first on BlogGeek.me.

How Zoom’s web client avoids using WebRTC

webrtchacks - Tue, 10/23/2018 - 10:30

Zoom has a web client that allows a participant to join meetings without downloading their app. Chris Koehncke was excited to see how this worked (watch him at the upcoming KrankyGeek event!) so we gave it a try. It worked, removing the download barrier. The quality was acceptable and we had a good chat for half an hour.

Opening chrome://webrtc-internals showed only getUserMedia being used for accessing camera and microphone but no RTCPeerConnection like a WebRTC call should have.

Continue reading How Zoom’s web client avoids using WebRTC at webrtcHacks.

WebRTC is Ready. Now What? (a look at the state of WebRTC in 2019)

bloggeek - Mon, 10/22/2018 - 12:00

There should be no doubt about WebRTC anymore. It is here and it is ready for everyone. The question is: “now what?” Where are we headed with WebRTC in 2019

Is WebRTC Ready Yet?

That was the name of a website that tracked how well is WebRTC adopted by the various browser vendors.

Apparently, it is also the most common question on Google about WebRTC:

It is time we say it outloud (I don’t believe anyone has done that up until now):

WebRTC is READY

I was asked to speak at Apidays Amsterdam last week, which was a true joy. The topic I was tasked was around WebRTC being a standard, and well… where are we headed next. So I decided to rephrase it a bit and ignore that tiny bit of a fact that WebRTC 1.0 still isn’t an official standard (nobody but those in standardization organizations and those opposing to adopting WebRTC seem to care either).

So I sat down to think what does it mean that WebRTC is ready. Which led to this question:

Why I think that WebRTC is ready?

The best way for me to answer that question was to give 3 recent examples on things happening with WebRTC (and I don’t mean Uber doing VoIP using WebRTC):

#1 – VP8 Supported by Safari

I’ve been a critic about Apple’s non-support of WebRTC and then Apple’s non-support of VP8.

The fact that Apple decided at the time to support only the H.264, a royalty bearing video codec, and ignore VP8, the royalty free alternative, wasn’t a good sign.

In the past two weeks, tweets and webkit bug links have been flying around, indicating that if the mountain won’t come to Muhammad, then Muhammad must go to the mountain. Or more accurately, that Apple decided to do a Microsoft and support VP8.

Do a Microsoft because this is the same steps Microsoft took when going WebRTC. Starting with H.264 and only later adding VP8.

So Apple has started with H.264 and only now adding VP8.

When will this be available for all? Ask Apple.

What’s important is that ALL modern browsers now support both VP8 and H.264. More on that in a sec.

It doesn’t stop there either. Apple joined the Alliance of Open Media as a founding member. This alliance is behind the future video codec AV1, and now has 40 members in it.

#2 – H.264 Simulcast Support

The second example is H.264. It is now becoming a first class citizen.

H.264 on Chrome didn’t have simulcast support. The “fix” for that was available for quite some time, but was never incorporated into Chrome. Simulcast increases the quality of group video calls, so not supporting it in H.264 made H.264 useless for group video calls.

There can be two reasons for this feet dragging by Google:

  1. Timing and priorities. Google didn’t really care enough to add that in and deal with the headaches of pushing code from a third party with the fix and validating it
  2. The push towards VP8. Increasing the quality of H.264 would get more developers to adopt it, especially when Apple supports only H.264 on Safari

Since VP8 is coming to Safari, the reason to give it an edge over H.264 isn’t there anymore. Especially considering the healthy growth of the Alliance of Open Media.

The end result?

  • All modern browsers support VP8 (Safari support is imminent)
  • All modern browsers support H.264; and simulcast will soon be possible for it
  • VP9 is available only in Chrome and Firefox for WebRTC – but who cares? The future will be AV1. And ALL browser vendors are part of the Alliance of Open Media where AV1 is getting specified (YouTube is already testing AV1 decoding in Chrome and Firefox)

This media codecs disparity between browsers was the main challenge for the WebRTC community. It is now behind us.

#3 – Google Shifts Focus

That third reason why I believe WebRTC is ready?

Google is shifting focus. It is doing what is needed to support WebRTC and the migration to the 1.0 specification (unified plan for example), but its heart and mind is already elsewhere:

At the beginning of this month, Google announced Project Stream – a cloud based service that streams high end games from resource intensive cloud based machines to low end devices in real time.

There’s not a lot to go on about the technology, but it seems to be based on WebRTC.

Project Stream official gameplay capture: 1080p@60fpshttps://t.co/SjznbRCBAP

— Justin Uberti (@juberti) October 2, 2018

Why else would Justin Uberti from Google’s WebRTC team publish this? 1080p resolution at 60 frames per second with low latency for gaming. This type of a use case is different from real time communications. It requires a different focus and optimizations. And yet… the WebRTC team at Google have probably spent some cycles on supporting it.

Why is that a good thing?

Because for Google, WebRTC is ready when it comes to real time communications, and beyond optimizations and house keeping, it is time to move on and look at other use cases where WebRTC can be beneficial.

What’s Next?

So. WebRTC is here:

  1. Apple supports it now; and there’s codec parity across browsers
  2. H.264 is a first class citizen in WebRTC
  3. And Google has moved on to other use cases for WebRTC

What’s next for WebRTC?

The answer I gave in that presentation at Apidays was Machine Learning.

I like that slide above. I like it because you can take RTC out of it, replace it with whatever word/term/industry you want and it will STILL be true.

In the rest of that presentation, I went over the research report that Chad Hart and I have written, sharing some of our findings.

I went into the 4 domains we’ve mapped in our research, in each giving an example of the impact and use cases that are now possible:

  1. Speech analytics, and how we’re shifting from offline processing to real time
  2. Voicebots, and how work in that area is accelerating
  3. Computer vision, where use cases are vastly different between consumer and enterprise settings
  4. Media optimization, and the shift from heuristics to machine learning
That Deck from Amsterdam

That slide deck from Amsterdam is now available online as well. You can view it here:

WebRTC is READY. What's Next? from Tsahi Levent-levi Machine Learning and Real Time Comms

If you are interested to learn more about machine learning, to be able to make smart decisions in your own company about the use and introduction of machine learning and artificial intelligence in a communications application, then definitely check out our report: AI in RTC

The post WebRTC is Ready. Now What? (a look at the state of WebRTC in 2019) appeared first on BlogGeek.me.

Breaking Point: WebRTC SFU Load Testing (Alex Gouaillard)

webrtchacks - Fri, 10/19/2018 - 05:47

If you plan to have multiple participants in your WebRTC calls then you will probably end up using a Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU).  Capacity planning for SFU’s can be difficult – there are estimates to be made for where they should be placed, how much bandwidth they will consume, and what kind of servers you need.

To help network architects and WebRTC engineers make some of these decisions, webrtcHacks contributor Dr. Alex Gouaillard and his team at CoSMo Software put together a load test suite to measure load vs.

Continue reading Breaking Point: WebRTC SFU Load Testing (Alex Gouaillard) at webrtcHacks.

Kamcli v1.1.0 Released

miconda - Tue, 10/16/2018 - 21:30
Kamcli v1.1.0 has been released. It is a command line management tool for Kamailio deployments, aiming to be a modern alternative to the venerable kamctl.Kamcli offers a set of subcommands for controlling Kamailio, among them:
  • subscriber – manage SIP subscribers
  • ul – manage user location records
  • address – manage permissions address records
  • aliasdb – manage database aliases
  • db – manage kamailio database content
  • dialog – manage active calls (dialog)
  • dialplan – manage dialplan records
  • dispatcher – manage load balancer (dispatcher)
  • group – manage group membership records (acl)
  • moni – continuous refresh of the values for a list of statistics
  • mtree – manage memory trees (mtree)
  • ps – print the details for kamailio running processes
  • rpc – interact with kamailio via jsonrpc control commands (alias of jsonrpc)
  • rpcmethods – return the list of available RPC methods (commands)
  • speeddial – manage speed dial records
  • srv – server management commands (sockets, aliases, …)
  • stats – get kamailio internal statistics
  • tls – management commands for TLS profiles and connections
  • uptime – print the uptime for kamailio instance
How to install kamcli and examples of usage can be found at:This release has been tagged on Github repository at:Enjoy! Thanks for flying Kamailio!

Can Google RCS Win the Messaging Game Through AI?

bloggeek - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:00

RCS is being brought from the dead by Google, and its next play will probably be with AI.

Carriers have a problem

SMS won’t stay here forever. In fact, most of the messaging traffic is happening on social networks now.

Voice is shifting as well. Migrating to these same social networks. With the ability to upgrade these calls to video calls. With stickers. And silly hats, cat lenses and whatnots.

Want to learn more about the use if silly hats and other AI features in communications? Check out our AI in RTC report preview

Download the preview

Their circuit switched network technology is decaying, left in its 80’s or probably 50’s. Most of what goes on there is spam or OTP passwords anyways. Nobody cares.

So much so that Google is planning on diverting incoming calls to its assistant (but more about it later).

The solution, in the form of IMS and later RCS (or call it Joyn or whatever other branding it was given throughout the years) are some 20 years in the making. And they don’t seem to be coming any time soon. At least not if left to the arduous processes of carriers and their suppliers.

Google has a problem

 

A VERY different problem.

Google has no messaging clout.

For consumers?

Apple iMessage wins on iOS. It acts as a Chameleon, catching up your messages and deciding if they should be demoted to SMS or use modern messaging via iMessage instead.

Facebook with Messenger and Whatsapp is ruling supreme in Android, and in many cases on iPhones as well. Where they aren’t as strong, you’ve got a slew of other social players with 100+ million monthly active users. None of them looks like a carrier. And none of them is Google.

Google has Allo, Duo, Chat, Meet, Hangouts, Messages and probably a few more apps that I’ve forgotten to mention. All in different states and capabilities; but none which is dominant compared to its competitors. Actual monthly active users and amount of real messages going between users? Not shared. Probably not stellar.

And Google has RCS..

For businesses?

Apple, Facebook and others are adding APIs. Introducing bot platforms. Building marketplaces. And they are doing it slowly, fearful of becoming the spam cesspit that is the good ol’ carrier communications tech today.

Slack is killing it. And the rest of the cadre of UCaaS and enterprise communications players are trying to move into their space.

Google has Meet and Hangouts Chat. Part of G Suite. Meet gets used. Hangouts Chat I don’t really know. But it seems that most just skip it and move on to Slack or some other tool.

Google also has nothing similar to a business angle to its consumer facing communications applications yet, or at least nothing popular enough.

What’s new in RCS land?

Nothing really.

I’ve written in April about RCS being still dead. For some reason, Google is still hammering away at it. Similar to Google+ if I need something to compare it to.

A press release last month by Samsung and Google brings Samsung to the RCS graveyard. New Samsung devices, and maybe layer older ones will come -gasp- with a Samsung Messages app that will work seamlessly with the Android Messages app using each other’s RCS technology!

This interoperability nightmare of the carriers will continue on, leaving RCS dead.

Adding new carriers or smartphones or chipset makes into the fold won’t help either.

And it isn’t as if Apple is making any noises of being interested in RCS, and why should they be?

That said, there are those who will be adopting RCS.

We are shifting towards an omnichannel world. No single protocol to rule them all. No single vendor to rule them all. You want to send your message as a business to a consumer?

You can use SMS. Or better do it over Messenger or Whatsapp or Apple Business Chat – there’s more context and richness in those, and consumers actually care about these channels. Which brings us to a place where businesses just need to support wherever their customers are with no decent common denominator.

And wouldn’t it be great if we could throw SMS and use RCS instead? At least where we can?

So CPaaS vendors are adding support for RCS and announcing it in their arms race to world domination by collecting as many social messaging icons as they can.

That’s great, but not enough to save RCS.

Can Google change RCS predicament?

Not really.

There are just too many players and this is a domain where Google has been struggling to go it alone as it is.

Here’s what it takes to bring RCS properly to the masses:

Chipset vendors

Chipset vendors are at the bottom of the food chain, but they need to offer their support to make RCS happen.

Unlike other messaging services, RCS is “bolted” on to the identity of the user and his device. The SIM card. The ability to connect the end user, through an application, to the SIM card, and from there to the carrier network is what presumably makes RCS different. But for that to happen, chipset vendors need to pave the way, even if just a little bit.

Handset manufacturers

Handset manufacturers need to make sure that the RCS application is there implemented, supported and pre-installed in the device.

Without being pre-installed, users will need to pick and choose between an RCS app from a handset manufacturer or a carrier (the word bloatware comes to mind) OR pick Whatsapp instead. The choice is a simple one for most.

They need to make the application attractive and sleek. Things they can’t really do. Competing with current successful social messaging apps requires a lot of investment. Nailing the user experience is a lot harder than it looks.

Carriers

Carriers need to actually support RCS. As a service. In their network. And have these things called mobile phones that support RCS. and enough people that have these devices so they can actually talk to each other.

Preferably, all carriers within a country should light on the switch on RCS simultaneously.

How likely is that to happen?

Single, very complex specification

And all of these players need to do so for a very complex IMS/RCS specification.

Testing the combinations of devices and networks is going to be hellish, especially for those who aren’t going to just select the default Google implementation of RCS client/server.

Which is exactly what Samsung decided to do. Have its own service and then interoperate it with Google’s. I can easily see other big players – chipset vendors, handset vendors and carriers who would be either scared shitless of ceding control to Google or not magnanimous enough in letting Google take control over that piece.

This headache also suggests something really important:

If RCS succeeds, it won’t move as fast as any of the other social networks in introducing new features, services and capabilities

There are too many moving parts, controlled by different players, some of which doing the same things.

Network effects

Then there’s the network effects.

When can I use RCS on my phone?

It needs to be installed there. Probably pre-installed.

The people I communicate should have it as well.

Our networks should support it.

Oh – and there’s this minor detail of me actually going into that app to send a message.

How many times this week have you clicked on this icon on your Android phone?

What about these icons?

Enter Artificial Intelligence

I’ve been thinking about it for quite some time.

How can Google become relevant in messaging?

It is unlikely to come from features and capabilities at the core of social messaging. None of its services stick:

  • Google+ was “shutdown” publicly this month. Google found a great excuse – a potential security flaw
  • Duo was supposed to compete head-on with Apple FaceTime, offering things like faster connections and knock knock feature. But what have we seen from Duo since its launch? And are you using it at all?
  • Allo was interesting, but got no adoption. It got halted on April if you believe the news
  • Hangouts is being replaced by Meet, at least for the enterprise. Will it be shut down for consumers? Time will tell
  • Hangouts Chat is only starting its way, though I haven’t heard anything at all since its public launch
  • Meet works just fine. For the enterprise. If you have a Google account
  • The Google Messages app is purely for SMS. And it is crappy to say the least. It doesn’t respond as fast or as fluid as other social messaging apps, and frankly, I don’t really care about the technical reasons for it

The one thing Google has going for it is AI. in droves.

Which is probably why Google Duplex is reportedly rolling out next month, helping phone users book tables at restaurants – on their behalf.

It is also why Google is now adding to its Assistant the ability to screen spam calls:

These AI features have a potential to actually succeed. They don’t really relate to RCS or even messaging, but they are about telephony.

Allo was about messaging. As reported on The Verge in the April Allo pause:

As part of that effort, Google says it’s “pausing” work on its most recent entry into the messaging space, Allo. It’s the sort of “pause” that involves transferring almost the entire team off the project and putting all its resources into another app, Android Messages.

Google won’t build the iMessage clone that Android fans have clamored for, but it seems to have cajoled the carriers into doing it for them. In order to have some kind of victory in messaging, Google first had to admit defeat.

That’s the Google RCS effort right there.

If you take the AI related features in Allo, and think of them as getting Google Assistant into Messages, the Google RCS app, then it makes sense in a way. But not enough sense.

The Google Assistant doesn’t feel like a product by now. It is a large set of features and capabilities that can be used to add smarts into phones. It is a window to the phone’s (and Google’s) AI for the consumer.

Limiting it to run for RCS only doesn’t seem like the right thing to do. Would it be enough to save RCS? Would it be enough for Google to gain back users from other messaging apps?

It is too early to say, as none of it as come to fruition in an app customers can use.

Google could have tried to do with Allo the same things it is doing with its Contact Center AI:

Provide the whole AI for communication part as an API, a set of building blocks for others to use and embed. It worked so well for them that it got many in the industry lining up to partner with it in contact centers. Launch partners for the Contact Center AI include Mitel, Genesys, Vonage, Cisco, RingCentral, Five9 and Twilio to name a few.

Would such a thing work with social messaging apps?

Apple wouldn’t touch it with a long stick for its iMessage.

Facebook wouldn’t either. So no Messenger or Whatsapp.

Telegram? I don’t see that happening.

WeChat? Chinese.

Who would they be left with? The smaller players, who might grow, but none seem to be rising above white noise level.

Which gets us back to Google itself. With Messenger/RCS/Chat.

What Google needs to do is find the sticky features that will get users to use its app. Those that can get value out of it even when the other participant isn’t using the same app. Add smarts into SMS itself, while providing a rich experience to the user when interacting with others who have that app.

The real question is why limit this to RCS and carriers? why not just offer it as the out of the box Android experience to everyone? Have it there by default. Let people download and install it on older devices and on iPhones.

Probably because Google still believes it relies on carriers for its Android success. Which is what’s keeping it back in mobile social messaging since Android came to our lives.

Want to learn more about the use if silly hats and other AI features in communications? Check out our AI in RTC report preview

Download the preview

The post Can Google RCS Win the Messaging Game Through AI? appeared first on BlogGeek.me.

WebRTC vs Zoom. Who has Better Video Quality?

bloggeek - Mon, 10/08/2018 - 12:00

WebRTC vs Zoom? WebRTC is actually quite good. But you knew that already – didn’t you?

They say quality is in the eye of the beholder. So behold.

We’ve all been told once and again that this video conferencing vendor or that video conferencing vendor work great. They offer the best quality. The best experience. They work in conditions that others don’t.

I even had a call once with an entrepreneur that explained to me how he is going to offer a service that is better in its 1:1 video quality than Skype and Google Hangouts. And he is going to do it with WebRTC. I spent the better part of that call to get him off that idea (something about his logic was off there).

But I am digressing.

As many others, I’ve been told time and again how Zoom is great. How in spite of the fact that it doesn’t work in the browser and forces you to download its client (some even refer to it as a virus), it gets traction and adoption. It feels like it is the best game in town. And then they mention the reasons:

  1. It’s free (until it isn’t, which is a great business model if you can make it work, and Zoom is making it work)
  2. It has better video quality than the competition. Especially WebRTC

I am not the only one who needs to listen to it, and even believe it to some extent. The guys at Jitsi got curious – why not put it to the test?

So they took a Mac device, placed it on a WiFi network, added a network limiter so they can fiddle with the network configuration, and did a 1:1 call. Once with Zoom. And once with WebRTC.

Idea is this – start with as much bandwidth as the video call wants. Then limit it to 500kbps. Check how much time it takes to adapt. Remove the limit and change how much time it takes it to adapt back. More about it in Jitsi’s blog.

Essentially – testing for this network conditions:

The longer that marked areas, the worse the experience is going to be for the users.

And guess what? Zoom faired worse than WebRTC. Not a little, but a lot worse.

Full adaptation to limiting the bandwidth took WebRTC 20 seconds. It took Zoom 156 seconds (!).

Ramp up back to 2mbps took WebRTC 32 seconds. It took Zoom 62 seconds.

Now here’s my analysis of this.

WebRTC Rocks

Yap. it really does.

The screen capture from that Zoom blog post that was pasted by Jitsi?

Stating that “web-RTC is a very limited solution that would not allow us to provide all the excellent features that our users have come to expect from us”?

That’s from 2015.

A lot have been improved in WebRTC since then, if that explanation was even correct in 2015 to begin with.

Without the need for most of us to do anything, we’re getting updates to a top notch media engine in the form of WebRTC inside the browsers we use. The code used in Chrome are open sourced, so they are accessible to all to embed it in their own applications as well.

Security fixes? New codecs? Improved media algorithms? They just “happen”. Out of thin air. For most of us.

Defending Zoom

If I look at it from Zoom’s point of view, besides the fact of being a dominant player in the market with or without WebRTC, here’s the challenges with such a test scenario:

  • It was done once, or a few times. But it is still only one scenario
  • It wasn’t a real life scenario. Just something concocted for this. Jitsi could have rigged it and tweaked it so that WebRTC would shine, but in real life, that doesn’t happen, and at Zoom we’re optimizing for real life scenarios
    • (that isn’t really so. From my experience and knowledge of the Jitsi team, I’d estimate they tried to be VERY careful here to not fall into that trap)
    • (and what’s real life scenarios anyway?)
  • The network limiter used changes behavior in ways that aren’t close enough to reality
    • (that I can understand and live with. We see faster uptake of the same type of scenarios for WebRTC at testRTC – more on that later)
  • Zoom might be working through external remote servers for that same session while WebRTC is going peer to peer on the local network. Servers behave differently than clients, so the results seem somewhat “off”
  • In other scenarios, Zoom might actually be better than WebRTC

Which leads us to the fact that more tests are needed to know which one is best and in which scenarios.

This starts to sound like the VP8 vs H.264 quality comparisons of the past (I never could tell the difference).

It’s the Infrastructure Stupid

With WebRTC, it all boils down to the infrastructure. The one with the better deployment wins the quality game.

  1. Do you peer to peer for 1:1 sessions and seamlessly switch to SFU architecture when more participants join?
  2. Where are your media servers located?
  3. Do you cascade the session across media servers to improve quality?
  4. Do you provide feedback to the user about the network conditions?
  5. Do you switch video off when there’s not enough bandwidth?
  6. How are you managing things like FEC, simulcast, SVC, … ?
  7. What about mobile and native app support?

And the list goes on.

With vendors who use proprietary codecs and transport protocols, this is doubly so, as they need to cater for the browser once they reach WebRTC. So while their native apps might be optimized, it might all go down the drain once they transcode or just “translate” to reach the browser using WebRTC.

Need to understand WebRTC and how to design and architect real world solutions with it? A first step is to understand the servers used to connect WebRTC.

Join a free video course on WebRTC servers

Which brings us to why someone like Zoom should use WebRTC and thing about the quality issues once connecting to it:

You Need WebRTC

Zoom already supports WebRTC. I just found out when I searched for stuff to write this article: there’s a Zoom Web Client

It runs on Chrome and enables using audio in Chrome when joining meetings. No video, probably because transcoding the proprietary video codec Zoom uses to the ones in WebRTC is too complicated, but using G.711 or Opus in the browser and transcoding or using the same in Zoom is way simpler.

Zoom is going through the same phases that Amazon did with Chime:

  • Amazon Chime started with a downloadable client
  • They then added limited browser support that enabled users to view the screen shared in the browser and connect via the phone without the need to download the client
  • Later on, audio support was added to the web client
  • And recently, video got supported
  • Screen sharing and remote desktop control still doesn’t work. I’d say it is a matter of time

This exact same path has been happening to other vendors in one way or another.

Why not Check Your Own Service?

While writing this article, it dawned on me, that this is one of these scenarios that is ridiculously easy to simulate using testRTC, so I went ahead and created a script that does just that:

  • Loads up Jitsi with 2 participants. That should cause them to work peer-to-peer
  • Run the call for 1 minute unhindered
  • Limit bitrate to 500kbps and run for 2 more minutes
  • Remove bitrate limit and run for 2 more minutes

Here’s how the main part of the script looks like:

   // Wait for 1 minute client    .pause(60*sec)    .rtcScreenshot('ALL GOOD');    if (probeType === 1) {    client        .rtcEvent('Start limit', 'global')        .rtcSetNetworkProfile('custom', 'bandwidth', 500000, 'both', 'both')    }    // 2 minutes with bandwidth limits client    .pause(60*sec)    .rtcScreenshot('LIMITED')    .pause(60*sec);    if (probeType === 1) {     client        .rtcSetNetworkProfile('') // back to pristine network conditions        .rtcEvent('Stop limit', 'global');    } client    // 2 more minutes unlimited    .pause(60*sec)    .rtcScreenshot('BACK TO NORMAL')    .pause(60*sec);

 

The .rtcEvent() calls are there to place a vertical lines on the graphs while the .rtcSetNetworkProfile() is there to fiddle around with the network conditions.

There were two probes here, each one a participant in the call. The first one is the one I limited while the second one was left “untouched”.

Here’s what the graphs look like on the second probe:

The above graph shows the outgoing birate. Within a span of 5 seconds, WebRTC finds out the new effective bitrate and adapts to it. Ramping back up takes some 20 seconds.

The above graph shows the incoming frame rate. You can see how frame rate reporting in WebRTC takes a bit of time to get back to its usual self – also some 20 seconds or so.

I wanted to check how the Jitsi SFU would behave, so I tweaked the test URL for that. The results? Still better than the Zoom one. 20 seconds to hit 30 frames per second and around 50 seconds to get back to full bitrate.

If you want to try it yourself, just import the JSON file in this Google Drive folder to your testRTC account and modify it to fit your needs.

Where to now?

WebRTC is more than good enough.

Making it better is usually about thinking your way through the best possible architecture, along with media servers that take care of network conditions properly.

As for Zoom… please make sure your next call with me is on something that has WebRTC. The machine I regularly use for call is Linux. Zoom doesn’t work there… it doesn’t really support Chrome or Linux. Yet.

The post WebRTC vs Zoom. Who has Better Video Quality? appeared first on BlogGeek.me.

Development Of Kamailio v5.2.x Series Is Frozen

miconda - Fri, 10/05/2018 - 10:12
Here we mark the freezing of development for Kamailio v5.2 series.From now on, for few weeks, no new new features will be pushed in the master branch. Development can still be done, but should be hold in developers’ GIT personal branches.Once the branch 5.2 is created (expected to happen in 3-4 weeks), the master branch becomes again open for new feature. Meanwhile the focus has to be on testing current code.Work on related tools (e.g., kamctl) or documentation can still be done as well as getting the new modules in 5.2 in good shape, plus adding exports to KEMI interface (which should not interfere with old code).The entire testing phase is expected to be 4 to 6 weeks, then the release of v5.2.0 will be out.Thanks for flying Kamailio!

Kamailio v5.1.6 Released

miconda - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 19:00
Kamailio SIP Server v5.1.6 stable is out – a minor release including fixes in code and documentation since v5.1.5. The configuration file and database schema compatibility is preserved, which means you don’t have to change anything to update.Kamailio® v5.1.6 is based on the latest source code of GIT branch 5.1 and it represents the latest stable version. We recommend those running previous 5.1.x or older versions to upgrade. There is no change that has to be done to configuration file or database structure comparing with the previous releases of the v5.1 branch.Resources for Kamailio version 5.1.6Source tarballs are available at:Detailed changelog:Download via GIT: # git clone https://github.com/kamailio/kamailio kamailio
# cd kamailio
# git checkout -b 5.1 origin/5.1Relevant notes, binaries and packages will be uploaded at:Modules’ documentation:What is new in 5.1.x release series is summarized in the announcement of v5.1.0:Thanks for flying Kamailio!

Messenger was not forced to wiretap but…

webrtchacks - Mon, 10/01/2018 - 22:26

By david drexler – Flickr, CC BY 2.0, Link

 

Back in August, Reuters reported on a “secret legal fight” between the FBI and Facebook about wiretapping Messenger calls. The Verge as they found our old post about reverse-engineering Messenger from 2015 and had a number of follow-up questions on it for a Messenger wiretapping article they ran. Technical details on the case are quite hard to find so I was not able to dig deeper into the specifics around wiretapping.

Continue reading Messenger was not forced to wiretap but… at webrtcHacks.

Astricon 2018

miconda - Mon, 10/01/2018 - 10:09
Astricon 2018, the Asterisk users’ conference, is just several days away. It takes place again in Orlando, FL, USA, during October 9-11, 2018.Kamailio is very well represented at this edition, besides having a stand in the expo floor, there will be presentations by Alex Balashov, Daniel-Constantin Mierla and Fred Posner.You can find the schedule and more details about the event at:We hope to see many of you in Orlando!Thanks for flying Kamailio!

Kamailio Developers Meeting, Sep 27-28, 2018, in Dusseldorf

miconda - Sat, 09/29/2018 - 10:02
Kamailio SIP Server project is organizing a meeting of its developers during September 27-28, 2018, hosted by sipgate.de in Dusseldorf, Germany.The event is intended to facilitate the interaction between Kamailio developers and to offer a convenient environment for working together on several topics of high interest for the project, including writing code for Kamailio and its tools, improving documentation, or discuss about future development.Everyone from the community is welcome to join. Please note we have a limited capacity of 20 seats in the meeting room. Also, very important to be aware that this is not an event to learn how to use Kamailio.More details about the event, the venue, how to register, are available at:Looking forward to those two intensive hacking Kamailio days in Dusseldorf!Thanks for flying Kamailio!

New Kamailio Module Exports Interface

miconda - Fri, 09/28/2018 - 10:08
As a result of collaborative work at Kamailio Developers Meeting, we succeeded to merge the two existing module exports interface (one for Kamailio modules and the other one from SER modules) in a single one.All public modules were updated, but if you have any private module then you have to update as well in order to get it compiled with the latest master. Just look at one of the modules (e.g., sl module is a good option) and all the fields in mod exports structure have comments with their meaning.In short: we removed unused fields for statistics, mi commands and extra-processes (from Kamailio old interface) and oncancel (from SER old interface), kept the RPC exports from SER interface and PV exports and dlopen flags from kamailio interface. The other fields were common in both interfaces, but be aware that order was also changed.If you have a module implementing the SER old interface, you also need to add the free fixup field in functions exports structure — you can just set it to 0.With this we have now a single mod exports interface in all modules, the core is also cleaner as we got rid of the various compatibility layers.Thanks for flying Kamailio!

Maintenance Work On deb.kamailio.org

miconda - Thu, 09/27/2018 - 10:07
There will be some maintenance work done to deb.kamailio.org server these days in order to move to a better infrastructure, so it may not be available for a while. The DNS needs to be updated as well, this also can affect you if your router/provider does caching.This is affecting the APT repository for Debian and Ubuntu packages.Update Sep 28: migration has been completed, if you encounter any issue with the apt repositories, contact us.Thanks for flying Kamailio!

Upcoming Events – Autumn 2018

miconda - Mon, 09/24/2018 - 10:06
The autumn of 2018 has plenty of events where Kamailio developers and community members will participate. Among them:If you attend any of these events or are around their location at their dates, get in contact with Kamailio’s community via sr-users mailing list and let’s meet, greet and discuss latest news about the project and RTC market.Enjoy the autumn!Thanks for flying Kamailio!

Pages

Subscribe to OpenTelecom.IT aggregator

Using the greatness of Parallax

Phosfluorescently utilize future-proof scenarios whereas timely leadership skills. Seamlessly administrate maintainable quality vectors whereas proactive mindshare.

Dramatically plagiarize visionary internal or "organic" sources via process-centric. Compellingly exploit worldwide communities for high standards in growth strategies.

Get free trial

Wow, this most certainly is a great a theme.

John Smith
Company name

Yet more available pages

Responsive grid

Donec sed odio dui. Nulla vitae elit libero, a pharetra augue. Nullam id dolor id nibh ultricies vehicula ut id elit. Integer posuere erat a ante venenatis dapibus posuere velit aliquet.

More »

Typography

Donec sed odio dui. Nulla vitae elit libero, a pharetra augue. Nullam id dolor id nibh ultricies vehicula ut id elit. Integer posuere erat a ante venenatis dapibus posuere velit aliquet.

More »

Startup Growth Lite is a free theme, contributed to the Drupal Community by More than Themes.